Corruption is the main outcome of democracy essay

This article has multiple issues. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. No one pretends that democracy is perfect or all-wise. Indeed, it has been said that democracy is the worst form of corruption is the main outcome of democracy essay except all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.

Economist Donald Wittman has written numerous works attempting to counter criticisms of democracy common among his colleagues. He argues democracy is efficient based on the premise of rational voters, competitive elections, and relatively low political transactions costs. Economist Bryan Caplan argues that, while Wittman makes strong arguments for the latter two points, the first is vitiated by the insurmountable evidence for voter irrationality. The problem is not merely the voters’ lack of information, but their poor judgement.

For many voters, the difficulty of learning about a particular issue is too high compared to the likely costs of ignorance, but this ignorance does not lessen their enthusiasm for voting. Other economists, such as Meltzer and Richard, have added that as industrial activity in a democracy increases, so too do the people’s demands for subsidies and support from the government. In this way, they argue, democracies are inefficient. Such a system could result in a wealth disparity or racial discrimination. The will of the democratic majority may not always be in the best interest of all citizens.

Voters may not be educated enough to exercise their democratic rights prudently. While arguments against democracy are often taken by advocates of democracy as an attempt to maintain or revive traditional hierarchy and autocratic rule, many extensions have been made to develop the argument further. In Lipset’s 1959 essay about the requirements for forming democracy, he found that almost all emerging democracies provided good education. However, education alone cannot sustain a democracy, though Caplan did note in 2005 that as people become educated, they think more like economists.

One such argument is that the benefits of a specialized society may be compromised by democracy. As ordinary citizens are encouraged to take part in the political life of the country, they have the power to directly influence the outcome of government policies through the democratic procedures of voting, campaigning and the use of press. For example, there is no guarantee that those who campaign about the government’s economic policies are themselves professional economists or academically competent in this particular discipline, regardless of whether they were well-educated. Essentially this means that a democratic government may not be providing the most good for the largest number of people.